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Streaming, this energy-intensive digital practice

  • Post category:Economy News
  • Reading time:2 mins read

Indeed, as recalled a study by the Institute of Computer Science at the University of Zurich published during this month of August, streaming – like other digital products for that matter – generates more CO2 emissions than it saves.

Looking at video streaming, the report says it would use 80% bandwidth globally. In addition, it would generate 56g of CO2 per hour of viewing. But this is only an average since this calculation depends very strongly on the size of the screen or the network used. A TV screen consumes more than an iPhone, just like 4G consumes more than your Wifi.

With 4.6 billion streams in seven months in 2017, “Despacito” consumed as much electricity as the annual consumption of Chad, Guinea-Bissau, Somalia, Sierra Leone and the Central African Republic combined

Although much less energy-intensive than video, the consumption of audio streaming is not zero. As an example, the study cites the song “Despacito”: “With 4.6 billion streams in seven months in 2017, “Despacito” consumed as much electricity as the annual consumption of Chad, Guinea-Bissau, Somalia, Sierra Leone and the Central African Republic combined. “

Not to mention that many people use video services – like Youtube – to consume music. “The problem is that YouTube in the free version does not let you listen to the music stream without streaming the video content. However, it is the video stream that pumps the energy”adds Nicolas Van Zeebroeck.