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Nuclear extension: the reopening of the two reactors expected for October 2026

  • Post category:Economy News
  • Reading time:6 mins read

Following the agreement in principle on the extension of nuclear power plants with Engie, the government held a press conference this Friday morning to give the details of this agreement.






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Lhe federal government and Engie have reached an agreement in principle concerning the extension of the operation of the Doel 4 and Tihange 3 nuclear reactors for a period of ten years, Prime Minister Alexander De Croo and the Minister of Foreign Affairs announced on Friday morning. Energy, Tinne Van der Straeten, in a statement.



During the press conference held this Friday at 9.30 a.m., Prime Minister Alexander de Croo announced that the federal government and Engie have agreed on the objective of reopening Tihange 3 and Doel 4 in October. 2026.

Engie and the government have established a framework for negotiations which should lead to a binding agreement by December 31 at the latest. In particular, they agreed to create a new entity for the two nuclear power plants, with a 50/50 shareholding between the Belgian State and Electrabel.

Ongoing negotiations

The framework thus provides for a stable and sustainable structure in which the Belgian State and Engie share the risks as well as the benefits through a new company to be created. Finally, the costs of dismantling nuclear power plants and managing fissile materials and radioactive waste are borne by the operator, explained Mr. De Croo (Open Vld) and Mrs. Tinne Van der Straeten (Groen).

Discussions will now continue and expert working groups will also be set up. Both parties aim to have a final agreement by the end of the year to submit it to the European Commission, the ministers said.



The federal government decided in March 2022 to start discussions with Engie with a view to extending the operation of the Doel 4 and Tihange 3 nuclear reactors for a period of ten years. This decision was taken in the context of major geopolitical changes in Europe, namely the war in Ukraine, the impact of this war on gas supplies to neighboring countries, the unforeseen unavailability of several French nuclear power plants and the impact of all these elements on Belgium’s electricity supply.