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If your car seems completely out of fuel, it’s not: here’s how many miles you can drive on reserve!

  • Post category:Economy News
  • Reading time:3 mins read

The warning light which lights up, the diodes which go out or turn red, the needle (for cars which still have one) which goes down under the last line… It is more than urgent to find a pump but even in this extreme situation, there is still a little hope because the manufacturers are deliberately looking wide.

Even if your gas gauge indicates that your car is completely out of gas, it is not. Older cars and cars built for long-distance driving often have a reserve tank, which keeps some fuel in extreme cases. The new cars don’t have a reserve tank, but they keep the same concept by saying that you drive empty before you actually get there.

In general, the warning light comes on when the tank has dropped to 10-15% of its capacity. So, if a full tank allows you to drive 600 km, you still have 60 terminals ahead of you. Our British colleagues from Car Throttle pushed the experience to its limit: driving a Honda Accord, they covered 150 km with the needle at half mast!

The remaining distance indicator is also a false friend because it bases its calculation on the last kilometers travelled. By adopting the basic rules of eco-driving (as few variations in rhythm as possible, low revs, higher gears, turning off the air conditioning, etc.), the figure can be increased, which does not mean that you have to fill up at the faster.

However, emptying the tank can have side effects because impurities and various types of dirt will have a better chance of being sucked up and clogging the fuel filter. But that’s another story.