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Eric Prydz brings… a whale to Tomorrowland

  • Post category:Entertainment
  • Reading time:8 mins read

Damn Main Stage. Even with an artist of the caliber of Paul Kalkbrenner, it’s true, on autopilot for a few years now, there’s been no way to find a festival-goer to dance with. Baptized “The Reflection Of Love”, the infrastructure is impressive, captivating, particularly successful, with its retro-futuristic style at the crossroads of the Star Wars and Argo universes.

A good part of the assistance came for that, another, quite simply to be there, “to live Tomorrowland” – and to show it well on Instagram – without really knowing who will play there. So, inevitably, the tens of thousands of festival-goers present on site immortalize their stay, take selfies, cut the end of fat by waving their flags, or hop in their Pikachu disguise. To really party, you have to hang out on the side of the fourteen other stages, all as impressive as each other.

©Tomorrowland

The largest and shinier festival in the country is not renowned for its finesse and its sense of poetry. So, even if it means nagging, you might as well go all out and contact the specialists of the genre: the Dutch producers. At 5:30 p.m., the Sub Zero Project takes over the Youphoria stage, recognizable by the gigantic purple mushrooms that overlook it.

Thomas and Nigel produce what is called Hardstyle, an ultra-powerful mixture of trance and techno, the main objective of which is to unleash its aficionados with kicks, basses, and unifying melodies that allow everyone to raise his small arms before stamping his foot. You have certainly already heard it during your Crossfit sessions.

Eric Prydz brings... a whale to Tomorrowland
©Tomorrowland

Lovers of subtlety risk a stroke, but in terms of release, it’s absolutely unstoppable. Each title lasts forty-five seconds, the two Batavians howl while jumping on their small jump seat, and the assistance shakes its fists vigorously, broad smiles with the lips. It smells like sport, alpha male and testosterone.

Three warm friends do us ten push-ups just after a pogo, when the space left vacant in the crowd has not yet closed, just to demonstrate, if necessary, that their impeccably inflated pecs are meticulously maintained.

Eric Prydz brings... a whale to Tomorrowland
©Tomorrowland

A 15-euro burger nimbly devoured, “the kindling” of the magnificent CORE stage is ideal for gently digesting in front of the welcome house of Gerd Janson and DJ Tennis, before a very brutal Rodhad, and a light and bouncy Amélie Lens while by swinging a raw and imperial techno. Professionally, we should migrate to Tiesto and Hardwell, to attend the closing shows on the Main Stage, but there is much more interesting on the other side of the site.

Scheduled three Fridays in a row on the Freedom Stage, Eric Prydz presents “Holo”, a 3D audio and video show that promises to be spectacular. The 46-year-old Swedish producer is familiar with the genre. Each year, it offers a new production in Antwerp. Faced with a decently filled room, without being complete, which we find totally incomprehensible given the show, he actually offers us an absolutely extraordinary experience.

Eric Prydz brings... a whale to Tomorrowland
©Tomorrowland

Well hidden behind a gigantic metal structure made of thousands of sensors, LED cells and other sources of visual effects, it plunges the festival public into an incredibly realistic and futuristic 3D universe. In turn, we find ourselves literally overhung by a terrestrial globe, flown over by an astronaut, or stuck under a gigantic humpback whale.

The effect is crazy, powerful. Dumbfounded, the audience would almost forget to dance. In its gigantism, sometimes vulgar and destabilizing, Tomorrowland can also offer great moments

Eric Prydz brings... a whale to Tomorrowland
©Tomorrowland
Eric Prydz brings... a whale to Tomorrowland
©Tomorrowland
Eric Prydz brings... a whale to Tomorrowland
©Tomorrowland