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Energy prices: Russian giant Gazprom reduces gas deliveries to Engie

  • Post category:Economy News
  • Reading time:5 mins read

Deliveries of Russian gas to Engie had already dropped considerably since the start of the conflict in Ukraine.


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Lhe French energy company Engie announced on Tuesday that the Russian giant Gazprom had informed it of additional and immediate reductions in its gas deliveries to it “due to a disagreement between the parties on the application of contracts”.



Deliveries of Russian gas to Engie had already dropped considerably since the start of the conflict in Ukraine, recently dropping to just 1.5 TWh per month, Engie said in a brief statement.

This figure is to be related to “total annual supplies in Europe greater than 400 TWh”, adds the main gas supplier in France, of which the French State holds nearly 24%.

The group recalls that it has already put in place measures to be able to supply its customers even in the event of an interruption in Gazprom flows.

“Engie had already secured the volumes necessary to ensure the supply of its customers and for its own needs”, it is indicated in the text.

Last Thursday, France’s gas stocks exceeded the 90% fill threshold for the winter, according to the European Aggregated Gas Storage Inventory (AGSI) platform and France is on track to meet its 100% fill target. here November.

Government spokesman Olivier Véran confirmed on Franceinfo radio on Tuesday that the target would be achieved “by the end of the summer” but warned that this did not mean that France would have “enough gas to spend the winter if the Russians cut it down and if we consumed a lot of it”.

At the end of July, Engie assured that it had significantly reduced its “financial and physical exposure to Russian gas”, which already represented only around 4% of its supplies.



“It’s completely within the margin of the flexibility of our portfolios, so we’re not at all worried,” said its managing director Catherine MacGregor at the time.