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A ‘durable’ tablet, good for disposal after three years

Nokia is launching two smartphones and a tablet, while strongly emphasizing the amount of recycled material it uses. But this communication seems to be mainly ‘greenwashing’, because after three years, all updates stop, even if the device is still working perfectly.

Nokia presents three new devices: the Nokia X30 5G, a 6.43-inch Android smartphone with Snapdragon 695 5G processor, 6 gigabytes of RAM and 128 gigabytes of storage capacity for 519 euros. Or a version with 8 gigabytes of RAM and 256 gigabytes of storage capacity for 549 euros. We learn here that their hull is made of recycled aluminum and the rear part is made of 65 percent recycled plastic. The packaging is made largely of recycled paper and by removing the top of the sheet it is even more compact.

Nokia X30 © Nokia

The second device is the G60 5G, a 5.58-inch smartphone equipped with the same chip and sold for 329 euros (4 GB of RAM and 128 GB of storage capacity) or 369 euros (6 GB of RAM in 128 GB of capacity storage). Here, the rear is made of 100% recycled plastic and the hull is 60 percent.

Nokia G60, Nokia
Nokia G60 © Nokia

The T21, finally, is a 10.36-inch tablet, equipped with a unisoc T612 chip and equipped with 4 gigabytes of RAM and 64 or 128 gigabytes of storage capacity sold at 249 and 269 euros respectively. Again, the shell is made from 60 percent recycled plastic and ‘all the durability and promise you’d expect from a Nokia tablet.’

Nokia T21, Nokia
Nokia T21 © Nokia

Durable hardware, disposable software

But this expectation is not really a reality. While a phone is replaced after two years already, a tablet is used for 4-5 years, especially when it receives a second life within the family with the children.

And this is precisely where the problem lies. For the T21, Nokia promises two years of OS upgrades and three years of security updates. That’s not much for a device that technically can last twice as long. It should be added that this timing begins today and therefore, any buyer of the device within a short year will still be able to enjoy it safely for only two years. The tablet will obviously continue to work, but then the security issues will no longer be resolved.

We asked HMD Global, the company that now represents the Nokia brand, why such a limit. The manufacturer hasn’t given us a clear answer, but says the current offering is already an improvement on what it was previously: ‘The T-series extends the promises of our previous G-series to the tablet range. The baseline promise for the G-Series of two OS upgrades and three years of monthly security patches now applies to the T-Series. evolution of our G-series, but we see this as a solid offering for an entry-level tablet.’

Three years for smartphones

The two smartphones stand out more: the X30 and G60 5G will receive three operating system upgrades and security updates of the same duration. Here we have to add the nuance, according to which this has already improved by one year compared to the two years that characterize most devices running on Android. It’s only recently, especially when it comes to the very latest Snapdragon chips, that we’re getting to three years. Only Samsung has revised this delay somewhat upwards. The difference with Apple is huge. Anyone who purchased an iPhone 6S in 2015 will receive updates again this year. For the iPad, five years or more is not an unusual time frame either.

It is still surprising that a well-known smartphone manufacturer explicitly announces that its devices are fully committed to durability, while in terms of software they are good for disposal after three years. In addition, all three devices, like most smartphones and tablets, have a battery that cannot be replaced, which further adds to the limitation of lifespan.

Nokia presents three new devices: the Nokia X30 5G, a 6.43-inch Android smartphone with Snapdragon 695 5G processor, 6 gigabytes of RAM and 128 gigabytes of storage capacity for 519 euros. Or a version with 8 gigabytes of RAM and 256 gigabytes of storage capacity for 549 euros. We learn here that their hull is made of recycled aluminum and the rear part is made of 65 percent recycled plastic. The packaging is made largely of recycled paper and by removing the top of the plug it is even more compact. The second device is the G60 5G, a 5.58-inch smartphone equipped with the same chip and sold for 329 euros (4 GB of RAM and 128 GB of storage capacity) or 369 euros (6 GB of RAM in 128 GB of storage capacity). Here, the back is made of 100% recycled plastic and the shell is 60 percent. The T21, finally, is a 10.36-inch tablet, equipped with a unisoc T612 chip and equipped with 4 gigabytes of RAM and 64 or 128 gigabytes of storage capacity sold at 249 and 269 euros respectively. Again, the shell is 60 percent recycled plastic and ‘all the durability and promise you’d expect from a Nokia tablet.’ But that expectation isn’t quite a reality. While a phone is replaced after two years already, a tablet is used for 4-5 years, especially when it receives a second life within the family with the children. hurt. For the T21, Nokia promises two years of OS upgrades and three years of security updates. That’s not much for a device that technically can last twice as long. It should be added that this timing begins today and therefore, any buyer of the device within a short year will still be able to enjoy it safely for only two years. The tablet will obviously continue to work, but the security problems will not be resolved afterwards. We asked HMD Global, the company that today represents the Nokia brand, why such a limit. The manufacturer hasn’t given us a clear answer, but says the current offering is already an improvement on what it was previously: ‘The T-series extends the promises of our previous G-series to the tablet range. The baseline promise for the G-series of two OS upgrades and three years of monthly security patches therefore now applies to the T-series. evolution of our G-series, but we see this as a solid offering for an entry-level tablet. operation and security updates of the same duration. Here we have to add the nuance, according to which this has already improved by one year compared to the two years that characterize most devices running on Android. It’s only recently, especially when it comes to the very latest Snapdragon chips, that we’re getting to three years. Only Samsung has revised this delay somewhat upwards. The difference with Apple is huge. Anyone who purchased an iPhone 6S in 2015 will receive updates again this year. For the iPad, five years or more is also not an unusual timeframe. It is still surprising that a well-known smartphone manufacturer explicitly announces that its devices are fully committed to durability, while on the plan software, they are good for disposal after three years. In addition, all three devices, like most smartphones and tablets, have a battery that cannot be replaced, which further adds to the limitation of lifespan.